Classroom Design Assignment


Classroom Design Assignment

As part of this week's Discussion Board, you will be designing an inclusive,

developmentally appropriate classroom for infants and toddlers. Use the information from

this week's articles and videos to create your own classroom map. Below is a list of free

websites for creating your own classroom (and I am sure there are many more if you do a

little research on your own):

http://classroom.4teachers.org/

https://www.kaplanco.com/resources/floorPlanner.asp

https://www.thelibrarystore.com

http://teacher.scholastic.com/tools/class_setup/

* Pintrest has examples of various classrooms*

When designing your classroom keep the following in mind:

? Size of the room -- it must adhere to VA State Standards

? It must have space for both infants and toddlers

? Placement of furniture (where will the cribs be/toddler naps?)

? Size of furniture

? Bathrooms, sinks, exits

? Traffic patterns

? Floor space for both infants and toddlers

? Can it accommodate children with special needs?

Once you have completed your classroom design, upload your map and explain the

following:

1. How your design adheres to state standards (how many infants and toddlers will it

accommodate? How many caregivers?).

2. How your design is developmentally appropriate for infants and toddlers.

3. Why you chose the furniture/accessories and how they enhance the classroom.

4. How the physical environment will foster learning for infants and toddlers.

Grading will be the same as the weekly discussion board. If you miss the due dates, you will not be eligible for full credit.

his week, we have been focusing on the state standards and how the physical environment (i.e. classroom design) is a critical component of learning and infant/toddler development. Using information from Chapter 12 in your textbook and your required reading/viewing this week, you will answer the questions below and create a developmentally appropriate and inclusive classroom (a class map) no later than Sunday.

Questions to be completed:

In what ways does the physical environment impact all developmental domains?

Why are state standards important when considering the physical environment of infants and toddlers?

What are some of the important elements that should be included in a developmentally appropriate and inclusive environment for infants and toddlers?

The directions for completing your class map are attached here Download here. Once you have uploaded your Classroom Map (just use the attachment feature), please explain the following:

1. How your design adheres to state standards (how many infants and toddlers will it accommodate? How many caregivers?).

2. How your design is developmentally appropriate for infants and toddlers.

3. Why you chose the furniture/accessories and how they enhance the classroom.

4. How the physical environment will foster learning for infants and toddlers.

Helpful websites for classroom design:

https://www.thelibrarystore.com/ (Links to an external site.)

http://teacher.scholastic.com/tools/class_setup/ (Links to an external site.)

Remember Find current research to support your position.

 

Chapter 12:
The Physical Environment

© 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

McGraw-Hill/Irwin

 

*

12-*

A Safe Environment

    • The physical environment must be safe.

 

    • Group size and adult-child ratio are important.

 

0-8 months should have a 1:3 ratio and 350 square feet per every 6 infants

8-18 months should have a 1:3 ratio and 500 square feet per every 9 infant/toddlers

18-36 months should have a 1:4 ratio and 600 square feet per every 12 toddlers

 

*

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A Safe Environment

  • Child-proof the environment (cover outlets, remove or tie drapery cords, etc.)
  • Know how to contact emergency personnel and put together an emergency plan.
  • Know first aid and CPR.
  • Always supervise children

12-*

A Healthful Environment

    • The environment must be healthy.

 

  • Wash your hands often.
  • Make sure there is good light and ventilation.
  • Wash children’s hands regularly.
  • Use precautions when preparing food, changing diapers, etc.
  • Learn signs of common illness and follow polices about reporting illness.

 

*

12-*

Nutrition

    • Food must be appropriate to:

 

  • Children’s age (at what age should infants start solid food?)
  • Children’s physical condition
  • Children’s cultural and/or religious tradition.

 

The tastes and habits children develop in the first three years can influence them throughout their lifetimes. Choose a well-rounded variety of wholesome foods and avoid sugary, fatty foods.

 

 

 

*

12-*

Nutrition

  • Feeding infants (Breast is Best!):
  • Make sure the room is supportive of breast-feeding mothers. Provide comfortable chairs in quiet corners of the room and be aware of the baby’s feeding schedule.
  • Learn how to properly handle and store breast milk:

Expressed breast milk should arrive cold and in a clean, sanitary bottle

It should be stored immediately in the refrigerator or freezer (if frozen)

All bottles should be labeled CLEARLY with the date of collection and the child’s name

 

 

*

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Nutrition-Infants

Any milk remaining MUST be discarded and not used again

Refrigerated breast milk should be discarded after 48 hours

Warm bottles by running them under tap water or in a container of warm water for five minutes or less

DO NOT use a microwave to warm breast milk

DO NOT let breast mild sit at room temperature because bacteria can grow

 

  • Provide for individualized infant nutrition. Follow pediatric guidelines and parent preferences on children’s food choices.

12-*

Nutrition

    • Feeding infants:

 

  • Avoid additives
  • Avoid mixtures (casseroles, etc.)
  • Use pure, unseasoned food
  • Talk with parents about special dietary needs

 

*

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Nutrition

  • Feeding toddlers:

 

Growth rates in toddlers plummet after the first year and appetites take a plunge.

 

  • Offer a nutritious variety of foods (avoid foods with additives)
  • Incorporate finger foods if culturally appropriate (use fruits and vegetables instead of cookies/crackers)
  • Use small portions and provide plenty of exercise and fresh air!
  • Avoid foods which may choke toddlers (popcorn, hotdogs, grapes, nuts, etc.)

 

*

12-*

The Learning Environment

    • The structure of a program depends on its environment. A well-designed environment supports infants’ and toddlers’ well-being, stimulates their senses, challenges their motor skills, and promotes individual and social development.

 

    • Behavior is influenced by environment—think about how you behave on a playground vs. a library? What cues do you get from the environment that tell you how to react?
    • All children should be accommodated in the environment. Make sure that children who have challenges are not limited by space, proximity to materials, restroom, sink, etc.

 

  •  

 

*

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The Learning Environment

    • Layout

 

  • There should be a designated area for arrivals and departures with a place nearby for children’s belongings.
  • The sleeping area should be away from the play area and have a subdued atmosphere with restful colors.
  • The eating area should be away from the diapering area.
  • If possible, keep the eating area away from the play area.

 

*

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The Learning Environment

    • Eating area

 

    • A sink, counter, refrigerator, and provision for warming food should be either in the room or near the eating area.
    • Children need small, low tables to encourage independence.

 

How do you feel about eating outdoors?

 

*

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The Learning Environment

    • Diapering/Toileting area

 

    • The diapering area should have counters or tables for changing diapers
    • A sink should be nearby and all supplies for diapering should be within easy reach, as well as sanitary disposal areas.
    • Toddlers appreciate child-sized toilets.
    • Children need access to a sink, soap, and towels.
    • The toileting area should be convenient to play spaces, both indoor and outdoor.

 

  •  

 

*

12-*

Developmental Appropriateness

    • The learning area must be developmentally appropriate. *What does this mean?*

 

    • Flexibility is required when infants and toddlers are in the same room. The environment must respond to the needs of a particular age group as well as to changes as children grow and develop.

 

*What does the word “flexibility” mean?*

 

*

12-*

Developmental Appropriateness

    • An appropriate environment for infants:

 

  • The younger the child, the smaller the group and space around should be. Space can be very frightening for younger children
  • Allows infants to be on the floor, but protected from walking feet
  • Has supports for infants who are newly upright (rails or furniture for “cruising”)
  • Only uses cribs as sleeping environments

 

*

12-*

Developmental Appropriateness

  • An appropriate environment for toddlers:

 

  • Is an environment that encourages independence (has sink at their level, pitchers for pouring, dish pans to bus their own dishes)
  • Invites toddlers to explore using both gross and fine motor skills
  • Contains a variety of age-appropriate toys and equipment that develop whole – body active, creative, and manipulative skills

 

*

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Developmental Appropriateness

    • Family child care:

 

  • May have a less “institutionalized” feel
  • May be smaller in scale and more homey
  • Is more likely to have mixed age groups, and must adapt the space to promote safe interactions and exploration for infants and toddlers

 

*

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What should be in the play environment

    • Newborns:
    • Just a few things to look at. People are most interesting.
    • Young infants:
    • Should not be distracted from hand exploration.
    • Multi-sensory toys not necessary.
    • 14 x 14 cotton scarf multi-purpose infant toy.
    • Older infants:
    • Bowls, wooden spoons, stackable plastic cups.

 

A mixed age group presents a different set of challenges. The provider must be diligent about providing a safe environment that allows play and exploration at all levels. Ex: Putting toys at different levels for different ages.

 

*

12-*

What should be in the play environment

    • Simple play materials, individualized attention, and a safe environment that promotes interaction are essential components to infant and toddler play.

 

  • Such conditions help children develop long attention spans, concentration, and other manipulative and physical skills.

 

*

12-*

What should be in the play environment

 

What toys and materials are appropriate for inside play?

 

 

What toys and materials are appropriate for outside play?

 

*

12-*

Assessing the Quality of an Infant-Toddler Environment

  • The five dimensions of a learning environment include:
  • Balancing soft and hard (blankets, stuffed animals, cozy furniture and hard surfaced floors hard play objects like pots, etc.)
  • Providing for intrusion and seclusion (allows for looking out windows and guests while providing space for “alone time”)
  • Encouraging mobility
  • The open-closed dimension (there are toys within reach, but there is also closed storage to help regulate choices/arrangement of furniture dividers/ability to use materials in more than one way)
  • The simple-complex dimension (uses simple materials for play, but when combined produces complex play (sand, water, utensils)

 

*

12-*

Assessing the Quality of an Infant-Toddler Environment

    • Simple toys and materials are best for infants.

 

    • Children under age three may need more open-ended materials than closed ones.

 

 

 

 

 

What types of toys are open-ended?

 

 

*

12-*

Assessing the Quality of an Infant-Toddler Environment

    • The following characteristics are also important:

 

  • Scale (the size of objects in the room)
  • Aesthetics (the visual appeal of the room)
  • Acoustics (are children who need quiet protected?)
  • Order (room arrangement can make a big difference in the order of a room)

 

*

12-*

The Physical Environment

    • Remember, when planning a physical environment, be sure to consider:

 

  • Developmentally appropriate practice
  • Individually appropriate practice
  • Culturally appropriate practice

 

*

12-*

Online Learning Center

  • See Chapter 12 of the text’s Online Learning Center for chapter quizzes, Theory Into Action activities, Video Observations, and more.


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